News and Updates

The SOURCE – Referral

WHAT CAN THIS DO FOR YOU?

We recognize that as a willing learner, you like others, may be struggling through concerns in our personal lives that may also struggle while at work. We remove barriers to employment and find the resources that people need in order to be able to keep their jobs and take care of their families. We partner with other organizations, businesses and the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) to create opportunities for people and build a strong workforce.

The SOURCE is a not-for-profit employee support organization designed to help employees keep their jobs, receive training to enhance their employment, and help employees move into better positions within or across companies. We do this by utilizing the best resources of the government, area non-profits, and private employers.

A key to the success of The SOURCE is that it is employer led and utilizes a cross-system collaborative model for long-term comprehensive support to employers, their employees and their families. In addition to employers, the collaboration includes partners from education and training, economic development, and social service (government and nonprofit) organizations.

The SOURCE leverages the collective resources of the public/private partners to offer services such as job specific training, personal growth classes, and support services to help overcome barriers employees face in retaining and advancing in the workforce.

The SOURCE is a self-sufficient, employer-led entity. The infrastructure is fully funded by the employer members because of the impact The SOURCE has on the employers’ profitability through reduced turnover, lower training costs and increased employee performance.

SOURCE HELPS WITH:

SUPPORT FOR
FAMILIES

HOUSING

SUBSTANCE
ABUSE

LEGAL
ASSISTANCE

HUNGER

HEALTH

PREGNANCY RESOURCES

source HISTORY

A group of manufacturers in Grand Rapids, Michigan, came together, originally to discuss child care issues in the workplace and how a solution to child care would help productivity and reduce turnover. The result was the formation of an organization named THE SOURCE. The goal of THE SOURCE was to return value to the employer partners in tangible ways. The methods used by its staff range from finding housing solutions for displaced employees, transportation solutions for employees who have problems getting to work, and access to a greater range of training opportunities; financial counseling for employees, ESL classes and Spanish Classes. THE SOURCE also functions as a best practices group for the Human Resource directors in each member company as well as a networking group for the member companies’ CEOs. THE SOURCE is a collaborative effort providing resources, support, training, advancement opportunities, and answers for their collective workforce and staff. The SOURCE brings together community, government, and private interests in an effort to leverage existing assets in order to strengthen the community’s workforce.

THE BUSINESS CASE

The businesses that chartered The SOURCE faced a difficult dilemma – each was operating on slim margins as a result of price competition, supplier demands and outsourcing. Each business knew that it’s human assets – the talent that each workforce offered – was a crucial part of the business’ competitive edge. Each business recognized that the most effective, long term solution to price pressures was to engage a team of workers that could focus on their job with a creative mindset toward continuous improvement. But employees brought pressures from home that distracted them on the job, and created behavior problems like absenteeism, poor performance, and turnover. The businesses recognized that additional employee relations resources would reduce the problem and save the company significant dollars. And, when these business owners realized they shared a common problem that could be addressed with a shared resource The SOURCE was created.

Stronger Together Working Remotely

As with most things worth doing, there are different levels of proficiency and sophistication to scale. It’s taken developers 10+ years to engage with these communication platforms.

Many newly-remote workers seem to combine there different tools by simply downloading Zoom, and having access to email to feeling as though they are discovering what this remote working thing is all about. People are just scratching the surface of the meaning of accountability and maximizing the production levels.

COVID-19 has forced companies the world over to enact — or create — remote working protocols. 

Most people are at Level 2. It’s when companies and consumers invest in Mastering Asynchronous Communication Tools (‘I’ll get to it when it suits me.’) that provides the benefits of time management working remotely. It’s all about productivity, accountability, and NO LONGER about hourly wages. It’s how we blend our work into a “Performance-Based” lifestyle. Nirvana!

The Five Levels of Remote Work — and why you’re probably at Level 2

To learn more foresight visit these portfolios below:

PARENTS, STUDENTS, TEACHERS & EMPLOYERS – EDUCATION & WORKFORCE RESOURCES

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT

MODERN MENTORING

PRIVATE SOCIAL NETWORKS

LEADERSHIP AND DEVELOPING DIVERSITY

EDUCATION

CONTENTS

HOW IT WORKS

HOW TO MAKE AN IMPACT

What Credit Score is Needed for Renting an Apartment?

If you’re looking for an apartment, whether it’s your first, third or fifth, the landlord or company will ask to run your credit check to ensure you pay your bills on time and haven’t had any financial disasters! What are they looking for? Landlords and rental companies look for consistency in rent payments and to see if any money is owed to a prior landlord or apartment manager. However, if you’ve had bankruptcies, evictions, foreclosures, or unpaid loans or credit cards, this will be a red flag to them.

Ready to find your dream apartment? Irvine Company has beautiful apartment communities in Orange CountySan DiegoLos Angeles and Silicon Valley.

When your credit report is pulled for the apartment, it’s considered a soft pull and will not drop your FICO score like a hard pull does. It’s more like a background check. Your employment history will be on file and you might be asked to provide your gross income as well, because the last thing a landlord wants is for their residents to be spending more than what they can afford on rent and utilities.

What credit score is needed for renting an apartment?

Most individuals or companies renting an apartment want credit scores from applicants to be 620 or higher. People with credit scores lower than 620 may indicate they are a high risk renter.

  • Anything below 579 is very poor
  • Between 580-669 is fair 
  • 740-799 is very good
  • Anything over 800 is excellent

What can you do if you think you have bad or no credit? Before apartment shopping, it’s a good idea to get your free Equifax and TransUnion credit scores and reports. You can also get a free copy of your credit report from each of the three main credit bureaus every year at AnnualCreditReport.com.

If the score is less than what you’d like to see, be sure to meticulously go over the report… there may be incorrect information you can dispute. Sometimes things happened a few years prior that are still on your report. If this is the case, consider appealing to your landlord with recent statements of bill pay history, such as cell phone bills and utilities to show you’ve been paying on time. If you have a healthy bank account, you could also provide a bank statement showing you have some cash.

And finally, stay on top of your credit report, and find alternative proof that you’ve paid accounts on time, if necessary. It may also help to seek credit counseling to show that you’re a responsible tenant.


If you have a hiccup in your credit and are in need to speak to a specialist about a low credit rental program – call or text LowCreditRents.com (517) 253-9992

7 Dos and Don’ts for Mentoring Apprentices — We Are Chefs

Happy National Apprenticeship Week! Now in its fifth year, this nationwide celebration gives businesses, communities and educators the opportunity to showcase their apprenticeship programs and apprentices while providing valuable information to career seekers. NAW 2019 is observed on November 11-17, 2019. ACFEF Apprenticeship programs provide an invaluable opportunity for budding culinary professionals to learn…

7 Dos and Don’ts for Mentoring Apprentices — We Are Chefs

Private Social Network | Build Your Own Community

private-community

WHY WE NEED MODERN MENTORING TO DEVELOP THE CHANNEL

Micro-Credentials, Community of Practice, Expert Path Panels & Path Plans

DESIGNED FOR EDUCATION

“Connecting knowledge and resources together in an online environment that serves the industry community with continued education for growing the ecosystem”

Professional Development, Performance Improvement, Succession Planning

A way for business operators, sales people, technicians, sponsors, and learning candidates (geographically dispersed) to collaborate, negotiate, and support preparation and certifications for professional development.

Imagine being the service provider for Micro-Credentials

The following video is an example: It demonstrates an education community developing Pat Smith, a 5th grade math teacher who inspires to become a middle school principal. It can be used for any community of practice.

Industry Modern Mentoring Programs (Education & Industry Practical Experience Resources working together)

Example:

o INSTRUCTORS: Instructs students in curriculum program knowledge and skills, assesses progress and collaborates with employers, vendor partners, sales managers, technical managers, and mentors.

o VENDOR PARTNERS: Gives direction. Thinks in terms of how learners fit into the needs of their organizations. Informs employers to work connections and how mentors coach for workplace readiness.

o SALES MANAGEMENT: Helps sales executives plan career paths and certification plans, monitors progression, works with instructors and mentors to identify sales people who needs coaching and mentoring.

o TECHNICAL MANAGEMENT: Help technical learners plan career paths and certification plans, monitors progression, works with instructors and mentors to identify learners who needs coaching and mentoring, and recognize talented learners that need opportunities to showcase their work whose performance needs support.

o MENTORS: Model and coach the traits of their successful industry experts and leaders and the value of education, professional training and graduation, work with the industry & trade associations to focus on specific working learner needs to refine their ePortfolios and connect with potential partners and employers.

UP TO 8 SEATSUnlimited replications for developing Support Teams, Work-groups, and Partnerships. Platform to “execute” ongoing growth plans, communicate the “next steps”, and drive “certifications” for approving micro-credentials.

WHITE LABELED PRIVATE SOCIAL NETWORKS
A sophisticated social learning platform for professional development, performance improvement & capacity development.  

FOR WHITE LABEL SALES CONTACT INFORMATION CLICK HERE

To learn more visit the [8] portfolios below:

  1. WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT
  2. MODERN MENTORING
  3. PRIVATE SOCIAL NETWORKS
  4. LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT
  5. EDUCATION
  6. CONTENTS
  7. HOW IT WORKS
  8. HOW TO MAKE AN IMPACT

For more up-to-date Articles & Activity visit Local Merchant Solutions

Replicating Resources for Micro-credentials:

The Role of People, Processes, and Systems to improve the cost-effectiveness of information technology by providing a mechanism for sharing services not economically or operationally feasible for a small business.

> To promote interoperability through use of web standards, open-source software, and shared services.

> A way for business operators, schools, sponsors, and learning candidates (geographically dispersed) to collaborate, negotiate, and support preparation and certifications for professional development.

> A way to document and promote real work done in the real workplace by real people as key components of leadership succession planning.

> A way for a collaborative team to coordinate and align leadership preparation with performance improvement plans.

> A way for a collaborative team to coordinate and align leadership preparation plans with university programs and industry apprenticeship certification programs.

> Allow individuals to keep and publish their professional portfolios.

> Provide mechanisms to track evidence of completion of key performances.

> Support industry certified professionals through competency-based education.

The Most Complete POS System for Franchises

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NEW FEATURES

Support for Cash Discount Programs

eDynamo EMV device

Wait List and Reservation Module

Kiosks for customer self-ordering

Complete Online Ordering solution

Central Kitchen and Warehouse

Caller ID integration

NEW PARTNER OPTIONS, INCLUDING

White Label POS option, build your own brand!

New Partner Portal

Marketing Resources

Benseron University for Online Linga Certification

New Affiliate Options and Benefits

Schedule an online demo today!

For more information or to connect with our partner team, contact:
1-800-683-4106 or partner@benseron.com
.

WHAT IT WAS LIKE TO COOK IN THE 60’S AND 70’S – THE THINGS I LEARNED

Looking back is not always the best rule of thumb – it is much more realistic to be in the moment and look toward the future. There are always lessons to be learned from the way it was, but we should never insist on living there when the world around us is changing.

There are many examples of how the restaurant business has evolved in a positive way, yet many of the problems that plagued those who worked in kitchens during the 60’s and 70’s still exist. Looking briefly back is always nostalgic and in some ways comforting, but future thinking that is built on understanding how we must change is far more productive.

Source: WHAT IT WAS LIKE TO COOK IN THE 60’S AND 70’S – THE THINGS I LEARNED